BRAIN FUNCTION AND BEHAVIOR: I. EMOTION AND SENSORY PHENOMENA IN PSYCHOTIC PATIENTS AND IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS

@article{Heath1975BRAINFA,
  title={BRAIN FUNCTION AND BEHAVIOR: I. EMOTION AND SENSORY PHENOMENA IN PSYCHOTIC PATIENTS AND IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS},
  author={Robert G. Heath},
  journal={The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease},
  year={1975},
  volume={160},
  pages={159–175}
}
  • R. Heath
  • Published 1 March 1975
  • Psychology, Medicine, Biology
  • The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease
For the past 25 years, the research program of the Tulane University Department of Psychiatry and Neurology has been directed primarily to the development of treatment for patients with certain psychiatric and neurological disorders that have been resistant to commonly used therapy. In the course of investigations, using a variety of approaches, new techniques have evolved which have permitted simultaneous exploration of brain activity and behavior. The data reported substantiate an anatomical… 

The cerebellar pacemaker for intractable behavioral disorders and epilepsy: follow-up report.

Thirty-eight patients who were intractably ill with a variety of behavioral disorders have been treated at Tulane with a chronically implanted cerebellar pacemaker. Included in the series ara

Brain function in epilepsy: midbrain, medullary, and cerebellar interaction with the rostral forebrain.

  • R. Heath
  • Psychology, Biology
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry
  • 1976
Rhesus monkeys with electrodes implanted into specific brain sites were used to demonstrate anatomical connections by evoked potential techniques and to serve as models of experimental epilepsy, providing an anatomical-physiological explanation for many of the clinical phenomena observed in epileptic patients and a rationale for the use of cerebellar stimulation as a treatment.

Dissociation, Epileptiform Discharges and Chaos in the Brain: Toward a Neuroscientific Theory of Dissociation

Dissociated states represent pathological conditions when psychological trauma may emerge in a variety of forms such as psychic dissociative symptoms or, on the contrary, as paroxysms or other

Prefrontal cortex dysfunction as a common factor in psychosis

Abstract It has recently become possible to arrive at a testable bio‐psychological model, according to which a dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex is the common factor in psychotic disorders; if

Toward a general psychobiological theory of emotions

  • J. Panksepp
  • Psychology, Biology
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences
  • 1982
The possibility that emotions are elaborated by transhypothalamic executive circuits that concurrently activate related behavior patterns is assessed and the manner in which learning and psychiatric disorders may arise from activities of such circuits is discussed.

Consciousness without a cerebral cortex: A challenge for neuroscience and medicine

  • B. Merker
  • Biology, Psychology
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences
  • 2007
It is suggested that brainstem mechanisms are integral to the constitution of the conscious state, and that an adequate account of neural mechanisms of conscious function cannot be confined to the thalamocortical complex alone.

Neuroanatomical-Behavioral Correlates in Autism: A Working Hypothesis

This chapter correlates emotions and attachment behavior in autism with the disturbed neuroanatomy found in the brains of these individuals. Neuropathological postmortem studies have consistently
...