BODY MASS AND FORAGING ECOLOGY PREDICT EVOLUTIONARY PATTERNS OF SKELETAL PNEUMATICITY IN THE DIVERSE “WATERBIRD” CLADE

@article{Smith2012BODYMA,
  title={BODY MASS AND FORAGING ECOLOGY PREDICT EVOLUTIONARY PATTERNS OF SKELETAL PNEUMATICITY IN THE DIVERSE “WATERBIRD” CLADE},
  author={Nathan D Smith},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2012},
  volume={66}
}
  • N. Smith
  • Published 2012
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution
Extensive skeletal pneumaticity (air‐filled bone) is a distinguishing feature of birds. The proportion of the skeleton that is pneumatized varies considerably among the >10,000 living species, with notable patterns including increases in larger bodied forms, and reductions in birds employing underwater pursuit diving as a foraging strategy. I assess the relationship between skeletal pneumaticity and body mass and foraging ecology, using a dataset of the diverse “waterbird” clade that… Expand
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