BMI and all-cause mortality in older adults: a meta-analysis.

@article{Winter2014BMIAA,
  title={BMI and all-cause mortality in older adults: a meta-analysis.},
  author={Jane Winter and Robert J. MacInnis and Naiyana Wattanapenpaiboon and Caryl Anne Nowson},
  journal={The American journal of clinical nutrition},
  year={2014},
  volume={99 4},
  pages={
          875-90
        }
}
BACKGROUND Whether the association between body mass index (BMI) and all-cause mortality for older adults is the same as for younger adults is unclear. [] Key MethodDESIGN A 2-stage random-effects meta-analysis was performed of studies published from 1990 to 2013 that reported the RRs of all-cause mortality for community-based adults aged ≥65 y. RESULTS Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria; these studies included 197,940 individuals with an average follow-up of 12 y. With the use of a BMI (in…

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