BIVOUAC CHECKING, A NOVEL BEHAVIOR DISTINGUISHING OBLIGATE FROM OPPORTUNISTIC SPECIES OF ARMY-ANT-FOLLOWING BIRDS

@inproceedings{Swartz2001BIVOUACCA,
  title={BIVOUAC CHECKING, A NOVEL BEHAVIOR DISTINGUISHING OBLIGATE FROM OPPORTUNISTIC SPECIES OF ARMY-ANT-FOLLOWING BIRDS},
  author={Monica B. Swartz},
  year={2001}
}
Abstract As swarms of the army ant Eciton burchelli forage across forest floors of the lowland Neotropics, birds gather to eat arthropods flushed by the advancing ants. Past efforts to distinguish members of the obligate ant-following bird guild from the many species that forage opportunistically with army ants have been inadequate. Obligate ant-followers track the locations of multiple nomadic ant colonies in order to maintain a consistent food supply. Each morning, they visit the bivouac site… 
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On the Caribbean Slope of Costa Rica, obligate army-ant-following birds find army-ants swarms before other birds and the calls of Ocellated and Bicolored antbirds attracted other ant-Followinging birds, indicating that some ant- following birds track the call of obligate ant-followed species to help finding army ants.
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