Corpus ID: 79186757

BISKANEWIN ISHKODE (THE FIRE THAT IS BEGINNING TO STAND): EXPLORING INDIGENOUS MENTAL HEALTH AND HEALING CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES FOR ADDRESSING SEXUAL TRAUMAS

@inproceedings{Reeves2013BISKANEWINI,
  title={BISKANEWIN ISHKODE (THE FIRE THAT IS BEGINNING TO STAND): EXPLORING INDIGENOUS MENTAL HEALTH AND HEALING CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES FOR ADDRESSING SEXUAL TRAUMAS},
  author={Allison Reeves},
  year={2013}
}
Multiple traumas, including sexual vulnerabilities, sexual abuse, and sexualized violence, remain substantially higher among Indigenous peoples in Canada than among non-Indigenous peoples. These trends are rooted in a colonial history that includes systemic racism, a deprivation of lands and culture and other intergenerational traumas. Mental health sequelae following sexual vulnerabilities such as abuse and violence may include mood disorders, low self-worth, posttraumatic stress and a range… Expand
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