BI-RADS categorization as a predictor of malignancy.

@article{Orel1999BIRADSCA,
  title={BI-RADS categorization as a predictor of malignancy.},
  author={Susan G. Orel and N Kay and Carol A. Reynolds and Daniel C. Sullivan},
  journal={Radiology},
  year={1999},
  volume={211 3},
  pages={
          845-50
        }
}
PURPOSE To determine the positive predictive value (PPV) of the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories 0, 2, 3, 4, and 5 by using BI-RADS terminology and by auditing data on needle localizations. MATERIALS AND METHODS Between April 1991 and December 1996, 1,400 mammographically guided needle localizations were performed in 1,109 patients. Information entered into the mammographic database included where the initial mammography was performed… 

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Is the BI-RADS categorization valuable for nonpalpable breast lesions in Chinese women?

It is concluded that BI-RADS is valuable for the categorization of nonpalpable breast lesions in the Chinese population and was feasible in aiding decision-making for biopsy.

Breast cancer in patients initially assigned as BI-RADS category 3.

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[Predictive value of breast imaging report and database system (BIRADS) to detect cancer in a reference regional hospital].

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The breast imaging reporting and data system: positive predictive value of mammographic features and final assessment categories.

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Positive predictive values of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS®) categories 3, 4 and 5 in breast lesions submitted to percutaneous biopsy

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...

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