BACTERICIDAL AND FUNGICIDAL ACTIVITY OF ANT CHEMICALS ON FEATHER PARASITES: AN EVALUATION OF ANTING BEHAVIOR AS A METHOD OF SELF-MEDICATION IN SONGBIRDS

@inproceedings{Revis2004BACTERICIDALAF,
  title={BACTERICIDAL AND FUNGICIDAL ACTIVITY OF ANT CHEMICALS ON FEATHER PARASITES: AN EVALUATION OF ANTING BEHAVIOR AS A METHOD OF SELF-MEDICATION IN SONGBIRDS},
  author={Hannah C. Revis and Deborah A. Waller},
  year={2004}
}
Abstract Songbirds apply ants to their feathers during anting behavior, possibly as a method of reducing feather parasites. We tested polar and nonpolar ant secretions and pure formic acid for bactericidal and fungicidal effects on microbial ectoparasites of feathers. Microbial inhibition trials were run with the bacteria Bacillus licheniformis (strains OWU 138B and OWU 1432B) and B. subtilis; and with the fungi Chaetomium globosum, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Trichoderma viride. Ant chemicals… 

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