Axon resealing following transection takes longer in central axons than in peripheral axons: implications for axonal regeneration.

@article{Ahmed2001AxonRF,
  title={Axon resealing following transection takes longer in central axons than in peripheral axons: implications for axonal regeneration.},
  author={Furqaan Ahmed and Nicholas A. Ingoglia and Sansar Chand Sharma},
  journal={Experimental neurology},
  year={2001},
  volume={167 2},
  pages={451-5}
}
Injury to axons in the CNS leads to little regenerative repair and loss of function. Conversely, injury to axons in the PNS results in vigorous regrowth of severed axons, usually with restoration of function. This difference is generally attributed to a CNS environment that either cannot support or actively inhibits regeneration and/or a failure of CNS neurons to survive axotomy. One of the earliest responses of neurons to axotomy is the resealing of cut axons. A delay in resealing could affect… CONTINUE READING