Avoidance of sun exposure as a risk factor for major causes of death: a competing risk analysis of the Melanoma in Southern Sweden cohort

@article{Lindqvist2016AvoidanceOS,
  title={Avoidance of sun exposure as a risk factor for major causes of death: a competing risk analysis of the Melanoma in Southern Sweden cohort},
  author={Pelle G. Lindqvist and Elisabeth Epstein and K. Nielsen and M. Landin-Olsson and Christian Ingvar and H{\aa}kan Olsson},
  journal={Journal of Internal Medicine},
  year={2016},
  volume={280},
  pages={375 - 387}
}
Women with active sunlight exposure habits experience a lower mortality rate than women who avoid sun exposure; however, they are at an increased risk of skin cancer. We aimed to explore the differences in main causes of death according to sun exposure. 

Response to ‘Avoidance of sun exposure as a risk factor for major causes of death: a competing risk analysis of the Melanoma in Southern Sweden cohort’

  • A. Torres
  • Medicine
    Journal of internal medicine
  • 2017
The results of this study may encourage the public, women in particular, to seek the sun and/or use indoor tanning devices, ultimately increasing their risk for skin cancer.

Response to ‘avoidance of sun exposure as a risk factor for major causes of death: a competing risk analysis of the Melanoma in Southern Sweden cohort’

A number of statistical and methodological issues should be considered and addressed before being able to declare sun avoidance to be a ‘risk factor for death of a similar magnitude as smoking’.

The relationship between sun exposure and all-cause mortality.

  • P. LindqvistM. Landin-Olsson
  • Medicine
    Photochemical & photobiological sciences : Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
  • 2017
Data support the hypothesis that sun exposure avoidance is a major risk factor for all-cause mortality in adjusted analysis and indicate that there is a need for modification of guidelines regarding sun exposure.

On the Relationship Between Sun Exposure and All-Cause Mortality.

  • P. Lindqvist
  • Medicine, Biology
    Advances in experimental medicine and biology
  • 2020
Data support the hypothesis that low sun exposure habits are a major risk factor for all-cause mortality and the need to carefully assess both risk and benefits of sun exposure in order to obtain balanced recommendations.

Are low sun exposure habits a genuine strong risk factor for all‐cause mortality or the result of bias?

It is demonstrated that women with the greatest sun exposure habits had a lower all-cause death rate from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and non-cancer/non-CVD than women who avoided sun exposure.

Sun Exposure - Hazards and Benefits

A brief update of hazards and benefits of sun exposure focused on an updated, balanced, and evidence-based view is provided.

Low sun exposure habits is associated with a dose-dependent increased risk of hypertension: a report from the large MISS cohort.

  • P. LindqvistM. Landin-OlssonH. Olsson
  • Medicine
    Photochemical & photobiological sciences : Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
  • 2021
It is concluded that in the observational design sun exposure was associated with a dose-dependent reduced risk of hypertension, which might partly explain the fewer deaths of cardiovascular disease with increasing sun exposure.

The Winding Path Towards an Inverse Relationship Between Sun Exposure and All-cause Mortality.

Women with active sun exposure habits were estimated to have a 1- to 2-year longer life-expectancy during the Melanoma in Southern Sweden study interval, but in opposition to present guidelines and recommendations.

Women with fair phenotypes seem to confer a survival advantage in a low UV milieu. A nested matched case control study

In a region with low UV milieu, evolution seems to improve all-cause survival by selecting a fair skin phenotype, i.e., comprising fair women with a survival advantage in regions with lowUV radiation.

Sunbed Use Increases Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Risk in Women: A Large-scale, Prospective Study in Sweden.

The findings support the idea of integrating dermatological follow-up examinations for immunosuppressed patients and banning the use of sunbeds in order to prevent cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.
...

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