Avoidance of bee and wasp stings: an entomological perspective

@article{Greene2005AvoidanceOB,
  title={Avoidance of bee and wasp stings: an entomological perspective},
  author={Albert Greene and Nancy L. Breisch},
  journal={Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology},
  year={2005},
  volume={5},
  pages={337–341}
}
Purpose of reviewClinicians and researchers in allergy and immunology are often unaware of aspects of stinging insect biology that would be of practical interest to their patients. This review discusses entomological literature pertaining to avoidance of bee and wasp stings, with emphasis on risk factors associated with provoking individual foragers versus disturbing colonies and preventive measures for both circumstances. Recent findingsRecent work pertaining to sting avoidance has mostly been… Expand
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  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology : official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology
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TLDR
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