Autophagy, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Response in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

Abstract

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a subtype of stroke that is followed by primary and secondary brain injury. As a result of the injury, cell metabolism is disrupted and a series of stress responses are activated, such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR), leading to the re-establishment of cell homeostasis or cell death. As an important mechanism of cell homeostasis, autophagy has been widely studied, and the associations between autophagy, ER stress, and the UPR have also been demonstrated. Whether these mechanisms are beneficial or detrimental remains a matter of controversy, but there is no doubt as to their vital functions. An understanding of the mechanisms of injury and recovery after ICH is crucial to develop therapeutic strategies. In this review, we summarize the related studies and highlight the roles of autophagy, ER stress, and the UPR in disease, especially in ICH. We also provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that target autophagy, and we discuss the prospects for modulating autophagy, ER stress, and UPR mechanisms in ICH therapy.

DOI: 10.1515/tnsci-2017-0008

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Niu2017AutophagyER, title={Autophagy, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Response in Intracerebral Hemorrhage}, author={Mingming Niu and Xiaohong Dai and Wei Zou and Xueping Yu and Wei Teng and Qiuxin Chen and Xiaowei Sun and W. L. Yu and Huihui Ma and Peng Liu}, booktitle={Translational neuroscience}, year={2017} }