Autonomy and Control in Public Hospital Reforms in Singapore

@article{Ramesh2008AutonomyAC,
  title={Autonomy and Control in Public Hospital Reforms in Singapore},
  author={M. Ramesh},
  journal={The American Review of Public Administration},
  year={2008},
  volume={38},
  pages={62 - 79}
}
  • M. Ramesh
  • Published 1 March 2008
  • Business
  • The American Review of Public Administration
The Singapore government began to reform public hospitals in the mid-1980s because of mounting public expenditures on health care. It granted public hospitals managerial autonomy and required them to compete for patients' fees. Correspondingly, patients were required to pay a larger proportion of the costs. When subsequent evidence showed that costs were increasing rather than decreasing, in the mid-1990s the government began to reassert its control while retaining the essence of the earlier… 

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