Autonomic responses to heat pain: Heart rate, skin conductance, and their relation to verbal ratings and stimulus intensity

@article{Loggia2011AutonomicRT,
  title={Autonomic responses to heat pain: Heart rate, skin conductance, and their relation to verbal ratings and stimulus intensity},
  author={Marco L. Loggia and Myl{\`e}ne Juneau and M. Catherine Bushnell},
  journal={PAIN{\textregistered}},
  year={2011},
  volume={152},
  pages={592-598}
}
In human pain experiments, as well as in clinical settings, subjects are often asked to assess pain using scales (eg, numeric rating scales. [...] Key Method In this study, we assessed heart rate (HR), skin conductance (SC), and verbal ratings in 39 healthy male subjects during the application of twelve 6-s heat stimuli of different intensities on the subjects' left forearm. Both HR and SC increased with more intense painful stimulation. However, HR but not SC, significantly correlated with pain ratings at the…Expand

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