• Corpus ID: 219260857

Automatic Counting of Restricted Dyck Paths via (Numeric and Symbolic) Dynamic Programming

@article{Ekhad2020AutomaticCO,
  title={Automatic Counting of Restricted Dyck Paths via (Numeric and Symbolic) Dynamic Programming},
  author={Shalosh B. Ekhad and Doron Zeilberger},
  journal={arXiv: Combinatorics},
  year={2020}
}
Dyck paths are one of the most important objects in enumerative combinatorics, and there are many papers devoted to counting selected families of Dyck paths. Here we present two approaches for the automatic counting of many such families, using both a "dumb" approach (driven by numeric dynamic programming) that often works in practice, and a "clever" approach, needed for larger problems, driven by "symbolic" dynamic programming. Both approaches are fully automated and implemented in Maple. 

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