• Corpus ID: 1733167

Automated Hate Speech Detection and the Problem of Offensive Language

@inproceedings{Davidson2017AutomatedHS,
  title={Automated Hate Speech Detection and the Problem of Offensive Language},
  author={Thomas Davidson and Dana Warmsley and Michael W. Macy and Ingmar Weber},
  booktitle={ICWSM},
  year={2017}
}
A key challenge for automatic hate-speech detection on social media is the separation of hate speech from other instances of offensive language. [] Key Method We used a crowd-sourced hate speech lexicon to collect tweets containing hate speech keywords. We use crowd-sourcing to label a sample of these tweets into three categories: those containing hate speech, only offensive language, and those with neither. We train a multi-class classifier to distinguish between these different categories. Close analysis…

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