Autologous HSCT for severe progressive multiple sclerosis in a multicenter trial: impact on disease activity and quality of life.

@article{Saccardi2005AutologousHF,
  title={Autologous HSCT for severe progressive multiple sclerosis in a multicenter trial: impact on disease activity and quality of life.},
  author={Riccardo Saccardi and Gian Luigi Mancardi and Alessandra Solari and Alberto Bosi and Paolo Bruzzi and Paolo Di Bartolomeo and Amedea Donelli and Massimo Filippi and Angelo Guerrasio and Francesca Gualandi and Giorgio la Nasa and Alessandra Murialdo and Francesca Pagliai and Federico Papineschi and Barbara Scappini and Alberto M. Marmont},
  journal={Blood},
  year={2005},
  volume={105 6},
  pages={
          2601-7
        }
}
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been proposed for the treatment of severe multiple sclerosis (MS). In a phase 2 multicenter study we selected 19 non-primary progressive MS patients showing high disease activity on the basis of both brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and sustained clinical deterioration despite conventional treatments. After stem cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide (CY) and filgrastim, patients were conditioned with BCNU (1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1… 

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...

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