Auto‐multilation in animals and its relevance to self‐injury in man

@article{Jones1978AutomultilationIA,
  title={Auto‐multilation in animals and its relevance to self‐injury in man},
  author={I. Jones and B. M. Barraclough},
  journal={Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica},
  year={1978},
  volume={58}
}
  • I. Jones, B. M. Barraclough
  • Published 1978
  • Medicine
  • Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica
  • Self‐mutilation in non‐human mammals is a well‐established, although not a widely known phenomenon, which has been reported under zoo and laboratory conditions. In macaque monkeys, laboratory rearing and isolation are important predisposing factors, and the more serious self‐injury is initiated by some immediate stimulating event. It is commonly accompanied by behaviour normally shown by the animal in a flghting context. Lower mammals are also known to mutilate themselves under laboratory… CONTINUE READING
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