Autism Overflows: Increasing Prevalence and Proliferating Theories

@article{Waterhouse2008AutismOI,
  title={Autism Overflows: Increasing Prevalence and Proliferating Theories},
  author={Lynn Waterhouse},
  journal={Neuropsychology Review},
  year={2008},
  volume={18},
  pages={273-286}
}
  • Lynn Waterhouse
  • Published 2008
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Neuropsychology Review
  • This selective review examines the lack of an explanation for the sharply increasing prevalence of autism, and the lack of any synthesis of the proliferating theories of autism. The most controversial and most widely disseminated notion for increasing prevalence is the measles–mumps–rubella/thimerosal vaccine theory. Less controversial causes that have been proposed include changes in autism diagnostic criteria, increasing services for autism, and growing awareness of the disorder. Regardless… CONTINUE READING

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