Autism: Transient in utero hypothyroxinemia related to maternal flavonoid ingestion during pregnancy and to other environmental antithyroid agents

@article{Roman2007AutismTI,
  title={Autism: Transient in utero hypothyroxinemia related to maternal flavonoid ingestion during pregnancy and to other environmental antithyroid agents},
  author={Gustavo C. Román},
  journal={Journal of the Neurological Sciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={262},
  pages={15-26}
}
  • G. Román
  • Published 15 November 2007
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of the Neurological Sciences
The incidence and prevalence of autism have increased during the past two decades. Despite comprehensive genetic studies the cause of autism remains unknown. This review emphasizes the potential importance of environmental factors in its causation. Alterations of cortical neuronal migration and cerebellar Purkinje cells have been observed in autism. Neuronal migration, via reelin regulation, requires triiodothyronine (T3) produced by deiodination of thyroxine (T4) by fetal brain deiodinases… 
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