Author's version vs. publisher's version: an analysis of the copy‐editing function

@article{Wates2007AuthorsVV,
  title={Author's version vs. publisher's version: an analysis of the copy‐editing function},
  author={Edward Wates and Robert Campbell},
  journal={Learned Publishing},
  year={2007},
  volume={20}
}
This report describes an informal study carried out by Blackwell Publishing to assess whether the copy‐editing and proof‐correction process alone results in a significant difference between the author's version and the publisher's version of an article accepted for publication. One hundred and eighty‐nine articles were reviewed from 23 journals. The results indicate that a substantial number of changes are made. It is suggested that copy‐editing has an equal role to play in both the printed and… 
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