Australopithecus sediba at 1.977 Ma and Implications for the Origins of the Genus Homo

@article{Pickering2011AustralopithecusSA,
  title={Australopithecus sediba at 1.977 Ma and Implications for the Origins of the Genus Homo},
  author={Robyn Pickering and Paul Hgm Dirks and Zubair Jinnah and Darryl J. de Ruiter and Steven Emilio Churchill and Andy I. R. Herries and Jon D. Woodhead and John C. Hellstrom and Lee R. Berger},
  journal={Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={333},
  pages={1421 - 1423}
}
Further U-series dating and the magnetic stratigraphy of the hosting cave deposits show that Australopithecus sediba lived just under 2 million years ago, near or just before the emergence of Homo. Newly exposed cave sediments at the Malapa site include a flowstone layer capping the sedimentary unit containing the Australopithecus sediba fossils. Uranium-lead dating of the flowstone, combined with paleomagnetic and stratigraphic analysis of the flowstone and underlying sediments, provides a… Expand

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