Australopithecus sediba and the earliest origins of the genus Homo.

@article{Berger2012AustralopithecusSA,
  title={Australopithecus sediba and the earliest origins of the genus Homo.},
  author={Lee R. Berger},
  journal={Journal of anthropological sciences = Rivista di antropologia : JASS},
  year={2012},
  volume={90},
  pages={
          117-31
        }
}
  • L. Berger
  • Published 2012
  • Biology
  • Journal of anthropological sciences = Rivista di antropologia : JASS
Discovered in 2008, the site of Malapa has yielded a remarkable assemblage of early hominin remains attributed to the species Australopithecus sediba. The species shows unexpected and unpredicted mosaicism in its anatomy. Several commentators have questioned the specific status of Au. sediba arguing that it does not exceed the variation of Au. africanus. This opinion however, does not take into account that Au. sediba differs from Au. africanus in both craniodental and postcranial characters to… 

Figures from this paper

Temporal evidence shows Australopithecus sediba is unlikely to be the ancestor of Homo
TLDR
It is highly unlikely that A. sediba is ancestral to Homo, and the most viable candidate ancestral species remains Australopithecus afarensis, although it postdates earliest Homo by 800,000 years.
Mandibular ramus shape of Australopithecus sediba suggests a single variable species.
Mating Behavior in Australopithecus and Early Homo: A Review of The Diagnostic Potential of Dental Dimorphism.
TLDR
It is argued that dental dimorphism be used only to support the most general assertions about hominin social behavior.
A new species of fox from the Australopithecus sediba type locality, Malapa, South Africa
TLDR
It is concluded that these Carnivora specimens recovered from the site of ‘Malapa’ are distinct enough to be referred to a new species, here described and named Vulpes skinneri.
Taphonomic Analysis of the Faunal Assemblage Associated with the Hominins (Australopithecus sediba) from the Early Pleistocene Cave Deposits of Malapa, South Africa
TLDR
The co-occurrence of well preserved fossils, carnivore coprolites, deciduous teeth of brown hyaena, and some highly fragmented and poorly preserved remains supports the hypothesis of a mixing of sediments coming from distinct chambers, which collected at the bottom of the cave system through the action of periodic water flow.
Reconstruction of the burial position of two hominin skeletons (Australopithecus sediba) from the early Pleistocene Malapa cave site, South Africa
The Malapa site has yielded unusually abundant and well preserved fossils of Australopithecus sediba. While some elements were found in situ during excavation, others were recovered ex situ from
Preliminary baraminological analysis of Homo naledi and its place within the human baramin
TLDR
Comparison of postcranial traits further supports the results, as 8 out of 15 characteristics show exclusive similarity to humans compared with only three characteristics shared exclusively with australopithecines.
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 57 REFERENCES
Australopithecus sediba: A New Species of Homo-Like Australopith from South Africa
TLDR
Combined craniodental and postcranial evidence demonstrates that this new species of Australopithecus shares more derived features with early Homo than any other australopith species and thus might help reveal the ancestor of that genus.
Carnivoran Remains from the Malapa Hominin Site, South Africa
TLDR
The fauna represented at Malapa has the potential to elucidate aspects of the evolution of Dinofelis and may help resolve competing hypotheses about faunal exchange between East and Southern Africa during the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene.
Systematic assessment of a maxilla of Homo from Hadar, Ethiopia.
TLDR
The new Hadar jaw is the first paleontological evidence for the projection of the H. habilis maxillofacial morphotype well back into the Pliocene, and may represent a male of this species, whose maxillary hypodigm consists chiefly of females.
Botanical remains from a coprolite from the Pleistocene hominin site of Malapa, Sterkfontein Valley, South Africa
A coprolite probably from a carnivore described in this paper was recovered from the decalcified sediments of Facies D, close to the cranium of a hominid child, Australopithecus sediba, at Malapa,
Earliest Homo
TLDR
Comparative studies allow us to assign KNM-BC1 to the genus Homo, making it the earliest securely known fossil of the authors' own genus found so far, and 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on material from the hominid site indicating an age of 2.4 Myr.
Morphology and affinities of new hominin cranial remains from Member 4 of the Sterkfontein Formation, Gauteng Province, South Africa.
TLDR
The principal conclusion of this overview is that the bulk of the cranial remains from Member 4 are attributable to Australopithecus africanus or are consistent with the anatomy of that species, while some others are indeterminate.
Paleoanthropology. Candidate human ancestor from South Africa sparks praise and debate.
TLDR
A group of fossils found since 2008 in Malapa cave north of Johannesburg and dated as early as 2 million years ago are described, which researchers say are those of a new species dubbed Australopithecus sediba, and the team argues that the new species may be the best candidate yet for the immediate ancestor of Homo.
A fossil skull probably of the genus Homo from Sterkfontein, Transvaal
TLDR
The new find supports the view that the Sterkfontein toolmaker was not the earlier A. africanus, but a later hominid related to Homo habilis, and is establishing indisputably the provenance of the specimen.
Phenetic affinities among earlyHomocrania from East and South Africa
Abstract A quantitative analysis that employs randomization methods and distance statistics has been undertaken in an attempt to further clarify the phenetic and taxonomic affinities of
Australopithecus sediba at 1.977 Ma and Implications for the Origins of the Genus Homo
Further U-series dating and the magnetic stratigraphy of the hosting cave deposits show that Australopithecus sediba lived just under 2 million years ago, near or just before the emergence of Homo.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...