Australopithecus sediba Hand Demonstrates Mosaic Evolution of Locomotor and Manipulative Abilities

@article{Kivell2011AustralopithecusSH,
  title={Australopithecus sediba Hand Demonstrates Mosaic Evolution of Locomotor and Manipulative Abilities},
  author={Tracy L. Kivell and Job Munuhe Kibii and Steven Emilio Churchill and P. Lennart Schmid and Lee R. Berger},
  journal={Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={333},
  pages={1411 - 1417}
}
The hand of Australopithecus sediba, a rare example in the hominid fossil record, shows short fingers and a long thumb consistent with improved precision gripping while retaining strength for climbing. Hand bones from a single individual with a clear taxonomic affiliation are scarce in the hominin fossil record, which has hampered understanding the evolution of manipulative abilities in hominins. Here we describe and analyze a nearly complete wrist and hand of an adult female [Malapa Hominin 2… 
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Postural and Locomotor Adaptations of Australopithecus Species
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It is argued that the evidence most strongly supports the hypothesis that Australopithecus species were fully upright, committed terrestrial bipeds that walked with a fundamentally human-like gait despite the fact that not all aspects of their morphology were identical to that of humans.
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TLDR
An evolutionary shift in hand morphology between Ardipithecus and Australopithecus is identified that renews questions about the coevolution of hominin manipulative capabilities and obligate bipedalism initially proposed by Darwin.
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