Australopithecus sediba: A New Species of Homo-Like Australopith from South Africa

@article{Berger2010AustralopithecusSA,
  title={Australopithecus sediba: A New Species of Homo-Like Australopith from South Africa},
  author={Lee R. Berger and Darryl J. de Ruiter and Steven Emilio Churchill and P. Lennart Schmid and Kristian J. Carlson and Paul Hgm Dirks and Job Munuhe Kibii},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={328},
  pages={195 - 204}
}
From Australopithecus to Homo Our genus Homo is thought to have evolved a little more than 2 million years ago from the earlier hominid Australopithecus. But there are few fossils that provide detailed information on this transition. Berger et al. (p. 195; see the cover) now describe two partial skeletons, including most of the skull, pelvis, and ankle, of a new species of Australopithecus that are informative. The skeletons were found in a cave in South Africa encased in sediments dated by… 
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