Australopithecus ramidus, a new species of early hominid from Aramis, Ethiopia

@article{White1994AustralopithecusRA,
  title={Australopithecus ramidus, a new species of early hominid from Aramis, Ethiopia},
  author={Tim D. White and Gen Suwa and Berhane Abrha Asfaw},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1994},
  volume={371},
  pages={306-312}
}
Seventeen hominoid fossils recovered from Pliocene strata at Aramis, Middle Awash, Ethiopia make up a series comprising dental, cranial and postcranial specimens dated to around 4.4 million years ago. When compared with Australopithecus afarensis and with modern and fossil apes the Aramis fossil hominids are recognized as a new species of Australopithecus—A. ramidus sp. nov. The antiquity and primitive morphology of A. ramidus suggests that it represents a long-sought potential root species for… Expand

Topics from this paper

Late Miocene Teeth from Middle Awash, Ethiopia, and Early Hominid Dental Evolution
TLDR
Fossil hominid teeth recovered from Ethiopia's Middle Awash suggest that the last common ancestor of apes and humans had a functionally honing canine–third premolar complex. Expand
New four-million-year-old hominid species from Kanapoi and Allia Bay, Kenya
TLDR
The mosaic of primitive and derived features shows this species to be a possible ancestor to Australopithecus afarensis and suggests that Ardipithecus ramidus is a sister species to this and all later hominids. Expand
A NEW SPECIES OF PLIOCENE HIPPOPOTAMIDAE FROM THE MIDDLE AWASH, ETHIOPIA
Abstract A new species of hippopotamid, Hexaprotodon bruneti, sp. nov., was discovered in both the Hata Member of the Bouri Formation and at upper Maka in the Middle Awash study area of Ethiopia.Expand
New hominin genus from eastern Africa shows diverse middle Pliocene lineages
TLDR
New fossils discovered west of Lake Turkana, Kenya, which differ markedly from those of contemporary A. afarensis point to an early diet-driven adaptive radiation, provide new insight on the association of hominin craniodental features, and have implications for the understanding of Plio–Pleistocene hom inin phylogeny. Expand
The new hominid species Australopithecus anamensis
TLDR
The material discovered so far displays primitive features along with more derived characteristics typical of later Australopithecus species, which suggests that A. anamensis belongs near the ancestry of this genus. Expand
New hominids from the Lake Turkana Basin, Kenya.
New hominid fossils from the Lake Turkana Basin range in age from ca. 3.35 to ca. 1.0 Ma. Those recovered from sediments stratigraphically just above the Tulu Bor Tuff in the Lomekwi Member of theExpand
Ecological and temporal placement of early Pliocene hominids at Aramis, Ethiopia
TLDR
Radioisotopic dating, geochem-ical analysis of interbedded volcanic ashes and biochronological considerations place the hominid-bearing deposits in the Middle Awash research area of Ethiopia's Afar depression at around 4.4 million years of age. Expand
Response to Comment on the Paleobiology and Classification of Ardipithecus ramidus
TLDR
Luis Sarmiento argues that these characters are not exclusive to hominids, contending that Ardipithecus is too old to be cladistically hominid, and his alternative phylogeny is unlikely because it requires tortuous, nonparsimonious evolutionary pathways. Expand
Morphological affinities of Homo naledi with other Plio-Pleistocene hominins: a phenetic approach.
TLDR
It is suggested that Homo naledi is in fact a South African version of Homo habilis, and not a new species, and this can also be applied to Australopithecus sediba. Expand
A new species of tilapiine cichlid from the Pliocene, Middle Awash, Ethiopia
TLDR
The Middle Awash locality has sites ranging from late Miocene through to the Pleistocene, and provides the first extensive record of fossil fish in Ethiopia, and includes many specimens of a tilapiine cichlid referable to the living genus Oreochromis. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 24 REFERENCES
A systematic assessment of early African hominids.
TLDR
The phylogenetic relationships of the newly discovered fossil hominids are assessed and a new taxon, Australopithecus afarensis, is created to accommodate these Pliocene hominid fossils. Expand
Early hominid from Baringo, Kenya
Palaeontological evidence and comparative molecular studies of modern hominoids suggest that major evolutionary changes occurred in the African Hominoidea between 14 Myr and 4 Myr1–3. Unfortunately,Expand
Pliocene hominid partial mandible from Tabarin, Baringo, Kenya.
  • S. Ward, A. Hill
  • Geology, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1987
TLDR
Although fragmentary, the preserved morphology of the Tabarin mandible is consistent with the diagnosis of the Pliocene hominid Australopithecus afarensis and can be distinguished from all other currently recognized hominoid taxa. Expand
Ecological and temporal placement of early Pliocene hominids at Aramis, Ethiopia
TLDR
Radioisotopic dating, geochem-ical analysis of interbedded volcanic ashes and biochronological considerations place the hominid-bearing deposits in the Middle Awash research area of Ethiopia's Afar depression at around 4.4 million years of age. Expand
New discoveries of Australopithecus at Maka in Ethiopia
TLDR
The discovery of new fossils from Maka, dated to 3.4 Myr ago, provide powerful support for the interpretation of A. afarensis as a single, ecologically diverse, sexually dimorphic, bipedal Pliocene primate species whose known range encompassed Ethiopia and Tanzania. Expand
Anatomy and age of the Lothagam mandible
TLDR
New anatomical data strengthen the allocation of the Lothagam mandible to the family Hominidae, most similar among known hominids to Australopithecus afarensis, and suggest that the LOTHagam hominid is older than 5·6 Ma, and is therefore the earliest known member of this taxon. Expand
Miocene fossil hominids and the chimp-human clade.
TLDR
Evidence from Rudabánya, Hungary, sheds new light on the question of the evolutionary relations among living hominids, and supports the view that humans have a specific evolutionary relation with chimpanzees. Expand
A hominoid humeral fragment from the Pliocene of Kenya.
The purpose of this communication is to describe and provide a preliminary interpretation of a hominoid proximal humeral fragment recovered from sediments more than 4.0 m.y. old in the BaringoExpand
Origin of the hominidae : the record of African large hominoid evolution between 14 my and 4 my
TLDR
Much progress has recently been made, but further hominoid specimens, coupled with environmental information from well-calibrated sequences, is necessary to elucidate the nature and causes of cladistic branching within the superfamily. Expand
Hominid-Pongid Distinctiveness in the Miocene-Pliocene Fossil Record: The Lothagam Mandible
TLDR
It is suggested that the dentaugnathic features enumerated in this study can be employed to distinguish ancestral hominid from pongid in future MioPliocene paleontological discoveries. Expand
...
1
2
3
...