Australian taipan (Oxyuranus spp.) envenoming: clinical effects and potential benefits of early antivenom therapy – Australian Snakebite Project (ASP-25)

@article{Johnston2017AustralianT,
  title={Australian taipan (Oxyuranus spp.) envenoming: clinical effects and potential benefits of early antivenom therapy – Australian Snakebite Project (ASP-25)},
  author={Christopher I. Johnston and Nicole M Ryan and Margaret A. O’Leary and Simon G. A. Brown and Geoffrey K. Isbister},
  journal={Clinical Toxicology},
  year={2017},
  volume={55},
  pages={115 - 122}
}
Abstract Context: Taipans (Oxyuranus spp.) are medically important venomous snakes from Australia and Papua New Guinea. The objective of this study was to describe taipan envenoming in Australian and its response to antivenom. Methods: Confirmed taipan bites were recruited from the Australian Snakebite Project. Data were collected prospectively on all snakebites, including patient demographics, bite circumstances, clinical effects, laboratory results, complications and treatment. Blood samples… Expand
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