Australian ecosystems, capricious food chains and parasitic consequences for people.

@article{Spratt2005AustralianEC,
  title={Australian ecosystems, capricious food chains and parasitic consequences for people.},
  author={David M. Spratt},
  journal={International journal for parasitology},
  year={2005},
  volume={35 7},
  pages={
          717-24
        }
}
  • D. Spratt
  • Published 2005
  • Biology, Medicine
  • International journal for parasitology
Characteristic Australian ecosystems or environments contain numerous food chains some of which may become capriciously side-tracked or appropriated by humans, with parasitic consequences for people in Australia and overseas. Twelve of 13 arboviruses affecting humans are of wildlife origin and all are transmitted by mosquitoes. In this case, transmission is thus associated with aquatic environments, many artificial. Zoonotic trematode (brachylaimiasis) and cestode (rodentoleposis) infections… Expand
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