Australian Wolf Spider Bites (Lycosidae): Clinical Effects and Influence of Species on Bite Circumstances

@article{Isbister2004AustralianWS,
  title={Australian Wolf Spider Bites (Lycosidae): Clinical Effects and Influence of Species on Bite Circumstances},
  author={G. Isbister and V. Framenau},
  journal={Journal of Toxicology: Clinical Toxicology},
  year={2004},
  volume={42},
  pages={153 - 161}
}
Background: Necrotic arachnidism continues to be attributed to wolf spider bites. This study investigates the clinical effects of bites by wolf spiders in Australia (family Lycosidae). Methods: Subjects were recruited prospectively from February 1999 to April 2001 from participating emergency departments or state poison information centers. Subjects were included if they had a definite bite by a wolf spider and had collected the spider, which was later identified by an arachnologist. Spiders… Expand
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