August Rauber (1841-1917): from the primitive streak to Cellularmechanik.

@article{Brauckmann2006AugustR,
  title={August Rauber (1841-1917): from the primitive streak to Cellularmechanik.},
  author={Sabine Brauckmann},
  journal={The International journal of developmental biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={50 5},
  pages={
          439-49
        }
}
  • S. Brauckmann
  • Published 2006
  • Biology
  • The International journal of developmental biology
In the early 19th century Karl Ernst von Baer initiated a new research program searching for the mechanisms by which an egg transforms itself into an embryo. August Rauber (1841-1917) took up this challenge. He considered the phylogenetic principle as the right tool to explain the similitude of embryogenetic processes. In extending Baer's approach, he combined comparative embryology and histology in his studies of avian and mammalian embryos. His earlier work demonstrated that the two-layered… 
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