Auditory verbal hallucinations and continuum models of psychosis: A systematic review of the healthy voice-hearer literature

@article{Baumeister2017AuditoryVH,
  title={Auditory verbal hallucinations and continuum models of psychosis: A systematic review of the healthy voice-hearer literature},
  author={David Baumeister and Ottilie Sedgwick and Oliver Howes and Emmanuelle Peters},
  journal={Clinical Psychology Review},
  year={2017},
  volume={51},
  pages={125 - 141}
}
Recent decades have seen a surge of research interest in the phenomenon of healthy individuals who experience auditory verbal hallucinations, yet do not exhibit distress or need for care. The aims of the present systematic review are to provide a comprehensive overview of this research and examine how healthy voice-hearers may best be conceptualised in relation to the diagnostic versus ‘quasi-‘ and ‘fully-dimensional’ continuum models of psychosis. A systematic literature search was conducted… 
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