• Corpus ID: 9302367

Auditory sensory cells in hawkmoths: identification, physiology and structure

@article{Gopfert1999AuditorySC,
  title={Auditory sensory cells in hawkmoths: identification, physiology and structure},
  author={Gopfert and Wasserthal},
  journal={The Journal of experimental biology},
  year={1999},
  volume={202 (Pt 12)},
  pages={
          1579-87
        }
}
  • Gopfert, Wasserthal
  • Published 15 June 1999
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of experimental biology
The labral pilifers are thought to contain auditory sensory cells in hawkmoths of two distantly related subtribes, the Choerocampina and the Acherontiina. We identified and analysed these cells using neurophysiological and neuroanatomical techniques. In the death's head hawkmoth Acherontia atropos, we found that the labral nerve carries the auditory afferent responses of a single auditory unit. This unit responds to ultrasonic stimulation with minimum thresholds of 49-57 dB SPL around 25 kHz… 
Tympanal and atympanal ‘mouth–ears’ in hawkmoths (Sphingidae)
The labral pilifers and the labial palps form ultrasound-sensitive hearing organs in species of two distantly related hawkmoth subtribes, the Choerocampina and the Acherontiina. Biomechanical
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TLDR
Research on insect hearing is embeded in a phylogenetic framework to reconstruct the ancestral sensory situation in different taxa, and the series of morphological changes during the evolution of an ear.
Diel flight periodicity and the evolution of auditory defences in the Macrolepidoptera
TLDR
Ultrasound sensitivity not only appears to protect eared moths from aerial predators (bats) but also protects them from terrestrial predators by allowing the moths to remain in the air during the night, and, it is suggested, is responsible for the success of this group of Macrolepidoptera.
Evasive response to ultrasound by the crepuscular butterfly Manataria maculata
TLDR
This is the first reported case of ultrasonic hearing connected to evasive flights in a true butterfly (Papilionoidea), and it strongly supports the idea that echolocating bats were involved in the evolution of hearing in butterflies.
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TLDR
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