Auditory feedback in learning and maintenance of vocal behaviour

@article{Brainard2000AuditoryFI,
  title={Auditory feedback in learning and maintenance of vocal behaviour},
  author={M. Brainard and A. Doupe},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2000},
  volume={1},
  pages={31-40}
}
Songbirds are one of the best-studied examples of vocal learners. Learning of both human speech and birdsong depends on hearing. Once learned, adult song in many species remains unchanging, suggesting a reduced influence of sensory experience. Recent studies have revealed, however, that adult song is not always stable, extending our understanding of the mechanisms involved in song maintenance, and their similarity to those active during song learning. Here we review some of the processes that… Expand
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