Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Persons With and Without a Need for Care

@article{Johns2014AuditoryVH,
  title={Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Persons With and Without a Need for Care},
  author={Louise C. Johns and Kristiina Kompus and Melissa Connell and Clara S. Humpston and Tania M. Lincoln and Eleanor Longden and Antonio Preti and Ben Alderson-Day and Johanna C. Badcock and Matteo Cella and Charles Fernyhough and Simon McCarthy-Jones and Emmanuelle Peters and Andrea Raballo and James G. Scott and Sara Siddi and Iris E. C. Sommer and Frank Lar{\o}i},
  journal={Schizophrenia Bulletin},
  year={2014},
  volume={40},
  pages={S255 - S264}
}
Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are complex experiences that occur in the context of various clinical disorders. AVH also occur in individuals from the general population who have no identifiable psychiatric or neurological diagnoses. This article reviews research on AVH in nonclinical individuals and provides a cross-disciplinary view of the clinical relevance of these experiences in defining the risk of mental illness and need for care. Prevalence rates of AVH vary according to… 
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TLDR
Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are experienced concomitantly with various neuropsychiatric Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by the Ethics diagnoses including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and borderline personality disorder.
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TLDR
The prevalence of AVH was found to be relatively high, and the results revealed higher levels of reduced mental health for individuals who sought professional help, followed by those who did not, compared with those who had never experienced AVH.
Preliminary Evidence for the Cognitive Model of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Youth With Borderline Personality Disorder
TLDR
This study replicated the link between negative appraisals of voices and depression that has been found in adults with SZ in a mixed diagnostic youth sample and provides preliminary evidence that the cognitive model of AVH can be applied to understanding and treating voices in youth with BPD.
Does hallucinatory predisposition influence voice processing? : probing the interactions between speech, identity, and emotion
Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are a core symptom of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia, although similar experiences have been widely reported in nonclinical samples. Due to these
Prevalence of auditory hallucinations in Norwegian adolescents: Results from a population-based study
TLDR
The prevalence of AVH in a population-based sample of 16–19 years old Norwegian adolescents using two items assessing AVH is in line with earlier reports in smaller samples of adolescents and indicates that AVH are not uncommon in this period of life.
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This review will examine the presentation of auditory hallucinations across the life span, as well as in various clinical groups, including childhood, adolescence, adult non-clinical populations, hypnagogic/hypnopompic experiences, high schizotypal traits, schizophrenia, substance induced AVH, AVH in epilepsy, and AVh in the elderly.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
As increased MTR in the arcuate fasciculus was present in both hallucinating groups, a specific association with AVH seems plausible, and a general decrease in fractional anisotropy for almost all bundles was observed in the patient group, but not in the non‐psychotic individuals withAVH.
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