Auditory Hallucinations: Psychotic Symptom or Dissociative Experience?

@article{Moskowitz2008AuditoryHP,
  title={Auditory Hallucinations: Psychotic Symptom or Dissociative Experience?},
  author={Andrew Moskowitz and Dirk Corstens},
  journal={Journal of Psychological Trauma},
  year={2008},
  volume={6},
  pages={35 - 63}
}
SUMMARY While auditory hallucinations are considered a core psychotic symptom, central to the diagnosis of schizophrenia, it has long been recognized that persons who are not psychotic may also hear voices. There is an entrenched clinical belief that distinctions can be made between these groups, typically, on the basis of the perceived location or the ‘third-person’ perspective of the voices. While it is generally believed that such characteristics of voices have significant clinical… Expand
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Abstract Introduction Despite the long association between auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) or voice hearing and schizophrenia, recent research has demonstrated AVH's presence in other disordersExpand
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  • Front. Hum. Neurosci.
  • 2012
TLDR
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Published research is limited regarding how auditory hallucinations may be meaningful to individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. This qualitative study is an in-depth exploration of auditoryExpand
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TLDR
Pathological dissociation predicted several aspects of voice hearing and appears an important variable in voice hearing, at least where maltreatment is present. Expand
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The purpose of this study is to offer a model in which auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) can be conceptualized as dialogical experiences. This model is of interest in that it integrates severalExpand
Beyond Trauma: A Multiple Pathways Approach to Auditory Hallucinations in Clinical and Nonclinical Populations
TLDR
This article suggests that trauma sometimes plays a major role in hallucinations, sometimes a minor role, and sometimes no role at all, and finds seemingly distinct phenomenological patterns for voice-hearing, which may reflect the different salience of trauma for those who hear voices. Expand
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