Atypical lobular hyperplasia as a unilateral predictor of breast cancer risk: a retrospective cohort study

@article{Page2003AtypicalLH,
  title={Atypical lobular hyperplasia as a unilateral predictor of breast cancer risk: a retrospective cohort study},
  author={David L. Page and Peggy A. Schuyler and William D. Dupont and Roy A. Jensen and W. Dale Plummer and Jean F. Simpson},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2003},
  volume={361},
  pages={125-129}
}
BACKGROUND Clinical decisions about atypical lobular hyperplasia are based on the belief that later invasive breast-cancer risk is equal in both breasts. We aimed to show laterality and subsequent risk implications of invasive breast cancer in women with atypical lobular hyperplasia. METHODS We did a retrospective cohort study of 252 women who had undergone 261 benign surgical biopsies that showed atypical lobular hyperplasia from 1950 to 1985, as part of the Nashville Breast Studies. Primary… 
Differences in Breast Cancer Risk Between Atypical Lobular Hyperplasia and Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia
TLDR
The authors found that women with any form of atypical hyperplasia had an odds ratio (OR) of 4.04 for the development of invasive breast cancer and an OR of 3.09 for any cancer, and suggested that premenopausal women diagnosed with ALH represent a particularly high-risk group.
Understanding the Premalignant Potential of Atypical Hyperplasia through Its Natural History: A Longitudinal Cohort Study
TLDR
The ipsilateral breast is at especially high risk for breast cancer in the first 5 years after atypia, with risk remaining elevated in both breasts long term, and ADH and ALH behave similarly in terms of later breast cancer endpoints.
Risk of invasive breast cancer after lobular intra-epithelial neoplasia: review of the literature.
TLDR
LIN should be considered both as a risk factor (low and similar level of IBC risk for both breasts, long delay between LIN and IBC) and a precursor for IBC (over-representation of lobular histotype).
Benign breast disease, mammographic breast density, and the risk of breast cancer.
TLDR
Women with high breast density and proliferative benign breast disease are at very high risk for future breast cancer, regardless of their benign pathologic diagnosis.
Pathology and Current Management of Borderline Breast Epithelial Lesions
TLDR
The pertinent pathological features, cumulative risk, and risk modifiers for subsequent invasive breast carcinoma, as well as clinical management of patients with these atypical lesions are reviewed.
Atypical epithelial hyperplasia of the breast: state of the art
TLDR
This review focuses on clinical signification and management of AEH that remains controversial and describes data from immunohistochemistry and molecular studies that suggest AEH is a precursor of breast cancer.
Breast-specific gamma imaging in the detection of atypical ductal hyperplasia and lobular neoplasia.
TLDR
A diagnosis of an atypical lesion is concordant with focal increased radiotracer uptake with BSGI and can identify women at increased risk for breast cancer.
Assessing the Relationship of Mammographic Breast Density and Proliferative Breast Disease
TLDR
Postmenopausal women with dense breasts who underwent a benign breast biopsy with benign histology had a significantly higher likelihood of having proliferative breast disease, regardless of underlying lesion type.
Accuracy of screening mammography in women with a history of lobular carcinoma in situ or atypical hyperplasia of the breast
TLDR
Adjunct screening may be of value in women with histology-proven LCIS, ALH, ADH, or AH history who had screening through Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium-affiliated mammography facilities if it reduces ICR without substantially reducing specificity.
Benign breast disease and the risk of breast cancer.
TLDR
Risk factors for breast cancer after the diagnosis of benign breast disease include the histologic classification of a benign breast lesion and a family history of breast cancer.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 27 REFERENCES
Risk of breast cancer associated with atypical hyperplasia of lobular and ductal types.
  • L. Marshall, D. Hunter, +4 authors G. Colditz
  • Medicine
    Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • 1997
TLDR
The risk of breast cancer associated with histological subtypes of benign proliferative breast disease, including the types of atypical hyperplasia, among participants in the Nurses' Health Study who had biopsy-confirmed benign breast disease was investigated prospectively.
Risk factors for breast cancer in women with proliferative breast disease.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the majority of women who undergo breast biopsy for benign disease are not at increased risk of cancer, however, patients with a clinically meaningful elevation in cancer risk can be identified on the basis of atypical hyperplasia and a family history of breast cancer.
A prospective study of benign breast disease and the risk of breast cancer.
TLDR
The results confirm the marked increase in breast cancer risk among women with atypical hyperplasia, particularly in premenopausal women, and suggest that these women should be encouraged to undergo frequent breast cancer screening.
Histologic types of benign breast disease and the risk for breast cancer
TLDR
It is suggested that women with BBD with epithelial hyperplasia either with or without atypia and women with fibroadenoma should be monitored carefully because of their elevated risk for breast cancer.
Atypical hyperplastic lesions of the female breast. A long‐term follow‐up study
TLDR
The authors conclude that among the epithelial hyperplastic lesions of the human breast, a minority may be recognized by their resemblance to CIS which have a clinically significant elevation of subsequent breast cancer risk.
Lobular carcinoma in situ of the breast: Preliminary results of treatment by ipsilateral mastectomy and contralateral breast biopsy
TLDR
The results tend to support the current recommendation to treat LCIS by ipsilateral mastectomy and contralateral biopsy, however, it would be necessary to study these patients for approximately ten more years before results can be considered conclusive.
Efficacy of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy in women with a family history of breast cancer.
TLDR
In women with a high risk of breast cancer on the basis of family history, prophylactic mastectomy can significantly reduce the incidence of Breast cancer.
Breast cancer after prophylactic bilateral mastectomy in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.
TLDR
In women with a BRCa1 or BRCA2 mutation, prophylactic bilateral total mastectomy reduces the incidence of breast cancer at three years of follow-up.
...
1
2
3
...