Atypical Polyagglutination Associated with an Acquired B Antigen

@article{Beck1971AtypicalPA,
  title={Atypical Polyagglutination Associated with an Acquired B Antigen},
  author={Malcolm L. Beck and R. H. Walker and Harold A. Oberman},
  journal={Transfusion},
  year={1971},
  volume={11}
}
The finding of an acquired B antigen, together with polyagglutination, in an elderly man led to studies indicating adsorption of bacterial material as the likely cause of both of these red blood cell anomalies. The various causes of polyagglutination are discussed. Based upon the differential characteristics of each type, a classification of polyagglutination is proposed. 
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Red blood cell polyagglutination: clinical aspects.
  • M. Beck
  • Biology, Medicine
    Seminars in hematology
  • 2000
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