Attitudes toward using condoms and condom use: difference between sexually abused and nonabused African American female adolescents.

Abstract

Rates of many sexually transmitted diseases remain higher among adolescents than among any other age group. The associations between abuse experiences and risky sexual behaviors suggest that exploring the relationships between adolescents' abuse history and condom use beliefs and behaviors is warranted. Females (N = 725) attending an adolescent clinic reported demographic characteristics, beliefs about condom use, sexual behaviors, and sexual abuse or molestation history. Those reporting sexual abuse or molestation (23%) were more likely to think condoms interfered with sexual pleasure and less likely to think condoms were important to partners. They also reported more unprotected vaginal sex and more lifetime sex partners. Beliefs were correlated with condom use consistency, number of lifetime partners, and number of unprotected sex experiences. The greater levels of behavioral risk among those reporting abuse suggest greater risk for acquisition and transmission in abused female adolescents. The authors discuss hypotheses to inform future research and intervention.

DOI: 10.3200/BMED.34.2.45-54

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Cite this paper

@article{Hall2008AttitudesTU, title={Attitudes toward using condoms and condom use: difference between sexually abused and nonabused African American female adolescents.}, author={Tricia Hall and Matthew Hogben and Anne L Carlton and Nicole C Liddon and Emilia H A Koumans}, journal={Behavioral medicine}, year={2008}, volume={34 2}, pages={45-54} }