Attention in Visual Search: Distinguishing Four Causes of a Set-Size Effect

@article{Palmer1995AttentionIV,
  title={Attention in Visual Search: Distinguishing Four Causes of a Set-Size Effect},
  author={John Palmer},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={1995},
  volume={4},
  pages={118 - 123}
}
  • J. Palmer
  • Published 1 August 1995
  • Psychology
  • Current Directions in Psychological Science
Visual search is a common task both in naturalistic settings and in the laboratory. Outside the labora tory, one might look for a car in a parking lot, a name in text, or a nav igation marker on the horizon. In the laboratory, search is simplified in several ways; commonly, the sub ject views a set of distinct objects and is asked to detect the presence of a particular object (the target) among a set of distractors. Two ex amples are shown in Figure 1. The top two panels illustrate the contrast… Expand
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