Attention capture by eye of origin singletons even without awareness--a hallmark of a bottom-up saliency map in the primary visual cortex.

@article{Zhaoping2008AttentionCB,
  title={Attention capture by eye of origin singletons even without awareness--a hallmark of a bottom-up saliency map in the primary visual cortex.},
  author={Li Zhaoping},
  journal={Journal of vision},
  year={2008},
  volume={8 5},
  pages={
          1.1-18
        }
}
  • L. Zhaoping
  • Published 7 May 2008
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of vision
Human observers are typically unaware of the eye of origin of visual inputs. This study shows that an eye of origin or ocular singleton, e.g., an item in the left eye among background items in the right eye, can nevertheless attract attention automatically. Observers searched for a uniquely oriented bar, i.e., an orientation singleton, in a background of horizontal bars. Their reports of the tilt direction of the search target in a brief (200 ms) display were more accurate in a dichoptic… 
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TLDR
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V1’s early responses are directly linked with behavior and represent the bottom-up saliency signals, likely serving as the basis for making the detection task more reflexive and less top-down driven.
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