Attack priming in female Syrian golden hamsters is associated with a c-fos-coupled process within the corticomedial amygdala

@article{Potegal1996AttackPI,
  title={Attack priming in female Syrian golden hamsters is associated with a c-fos-coupled process within the corticomedial amygdala},
  author={Michael Potegal and Craig F. Ferris and Mark A. Hebert and J. L. Meyerhoff and L. Skaredoff},
  journal={Neuroscience},
  year={1996},
  volume={75},
  pages={869-880}
}
Allowing a resident hamster a single "priming" attack on a conspecific induces a transient aggressive arousal as indicated by a reduction in the latency and increase in the probability of attack on a second intruder presented within the next 30 min. We present two lines of evidence identifying the corticomedial amygdala as an important locus mediating this effect. (1) Attack priming significantly increases the number of neurons expressing immunocytochemically identified Fos protein in the… Expand
Neural Connections of the Anterior Hypothalamus and Agonistic Behavior in Golden Hamsters
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Increased density of Fos-immunoreactivity was found in experimental animals within the medial amygdaloid nucleus, ventrolateral hypothalamus, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and dorsolateral part of the midbrain central gray, suggesting that these areas are integrated in a neural network centered on the anterior hypothalamus and involved in the consummation of offensive aggression. Expand
C-FOS changes following an aggressive encounter in female California mice: A synthesis of behavior, hormone changes and neural activity
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It is hypothesized that the BNST and the LSv may be involved more generally in mediating natural changes in aggression, such as increases often observed after individuals win aggressive interactions against conspecifics. Expand
High Frequency Stimulation of the Corticomedial Amygdala Increases the Aggressiveness of Male Syrian Golden Hamsters . 6 . AUTHOR ( S )
s, 17, 877. Potegal, M., Hebert, M, & Meyerhoff, J. M. (1996). Copulatory and attack priming in male golden hamsters. Manuscript in preparation. Potegal, M., & Popken, J. (1985). The time course ofExpand
Brief, high-frequency stimulation of the corticomedial amygdala induces a delayed and prolonged increase of aggressiveness in male Syrian golden hamsters.
TLDR
Immunocytochemical analysis suggests that stimulation effects may be coupled to c-fos expression and that unilateral stimulation has bilateral effects, and that CMA stimulation effects appear to mimic part of the time course of behaviorally induced attack priming. Expand
Persistent activation of select forebrain regions in aggressive, adolescent cocaine-treated hamsters
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It is suggested that adolescent cocaine exposure may constitutively activate neurons in select forebrain areas critical for the regulation of aggression in hamsters. Expand
Functional Substrates of Social Odor Processing within the Corticomedial Amygdala: Implications for Reproductive Behavior in Male Syrian Hamsters
Adaptive reproductive behavior requires the ability to recognize and approach possible mating partners in the environment. Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) provide a useful animal model byExpand
Potentiation of Divergent Medial Amygdala Pathways Drives Experience-Dependent Aggression Escalation
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Two aggression pathways are identified between the posterior ventral segment of the medial amygdala and its downstream synaptic partners, the ventromedial hypothalamus and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis that undergo synaptic potentiation after attack and traumatic stress to enhance aggression. Expand
Prior fighting experience increases aggression in Syrian hamsters: implications for a role of dopamine in the winner effect.
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The data implicate the presence of a winner effect in hamsters and provide evidence for a neural mechanism underlying the changes in aggressive behavior after repeated agonistic encounters. Expand
Social Stress in Hamsters: Defeat Activates Specific Neurocircuits within the Brain
TLDR
Fighting increased c-fosexpression in the medial amygdaloid nucleus of both DOM and SUB males as well as having more selective effects, which is discussed in relation to neurocircuits associated with behavioral arousal and stress. Expand
Functional internal complexity of amygdala: focus on gene activity mapping after behavioral training and drugs of abuse.
TLDR
The studies on the gene activity markers, confronted with other approaches involving neuroanatomy, physiology, and the lesion method, have revealed novel aspects of the amygdala, especially pointing to functional heterogeneity of this brain region that does not fit very well into contemporarily active debate on serial versus parallel information processing within the amygdala. Expand
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Brief, high-frequency stimulation of the corticomedial amygdala induces a delayed and prolonged increase of aggressiveness in male Syrian golden hamsters.
TLDR
Immunocytochemical analysis suggests that stimulation effects may be coupled to c-fos expression and that unilateral stimulation has bilateral effects, and that CMA stimulation effects appear to mimic part of the time course of behaviorally induced attack priming. Expand
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