Attachment, aggression and holding: A cautionary tale

@article{Boris2003AttachmentAA,
  title={Attachment, aggression and holding: A cautionary tale},
  author={Neil W. Boris},
  journal={Attachment \& Human Development},
  year={2003},
  volume={5},
  pages={245 - 247}
}
  • N. Boris
  • Published 1 September 2003
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Attachment & Human Development
O’Connor and Zeanah’s review of assessment strategies and treatment approaches for attachment disorders is both timely and important. There were at least two deaths in the USA in 2002 attributed to interventions designed to address the specific ‘attachment problems’ of children. The forensic details suggest that the treatments employed in these cases were somewhat different; however, in both instances forcible restraint (e.g., a form of holding therapy) was used in an effort to ‘promote re… 
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  • 2018
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Preliminary evidence is provided that EMDR may be a promising therapy in the treatment of disorders related to attachment trauma and an integrative EMDR and family therapy team model was implemented to improve attachment and symptoms in a child with a history of relational loss and trauma.
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Preliminary evidence is provided that EMDR may be a promising therapy in the treatment of disorders related to attachment trauma and an integrative EMDR and family therapy team model was implemented to improve attachment and symptoms in a child with a history of relational loss and trauma.
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