Atomic Radii in Crystals

@article{Slater1964AtomicRI,
  title={Atomic Radii in Crystals},
  author={John Clarke . Slater},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Physics},
  year={1964},
  volume={41},
  pages={3199-3204}
}
  • J. C. Slater
  • Published 15 November 1964
  • Physics
  • Journal of Chemical Physics
A set of empirical atomic radii has been set up, such that the sum of the radii of two atoms forming a bond in a crystal or molecule gives an approximate value of the internuclear distance. These radii give fair agreement with experiment in over 1200 cases of bonds in all types of crystals and molecules, with an average deviation of about 0.12 A. The radii are similar to a set suggested by W. L. Bragg in 1920, but refined by consideration of many more crystals. They hold for covalent, metallic… 
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