Atmospheric content of Nigrospora spores in Jamaican banana plantations.

@article{Meredith1961AtmosphericCO,
  title={Atmospheric content of Nigrospora spores in Jamaican banana plantations.},
  author={D. Meredith},
  journal={Journal of general microbiology},
  year={1961},
  volume={26},
  pages={
          343-9
        }
}
  • D. Meredith
  • Published 1961
  • Environmental Science, Medicine
  • Journal of general microbiology
SUMMARY: The air in three Jamaican banana plantations was sampled from 20 July 1960 to 15 April 1961 with a Hirst spore trap. Spores of Nigrospora were regular components of the air-spora. They exhibited a regular and sharply defined diurnal periodicity, rapid liberation of spores starting at about 07.00 hr. and reaching a peak between 08.00 and 10.00 hr.; very few spores were trapped during the night. This is consistent with the fact that spore discharge occurs only under conditions of… Expand

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