Atmospheric chemistry in the Arctic and subarctic: Influence of natural fires, industrial emissions, and stratospheric inputs

@article{Wofsy1992AtmosphericCI,
  title={Atmospheric chemistry in the Arctic and subarctic: Influence of natural fires, industrial emissions, and stratospheric inputs},
  author={Steven C. Wofsy and G. W. Sachse and Gerald L. Gregory and Donald Ray Blake and John David Bradshaw and Scott T. Sandholm and H. Bhaskar Singh and John A. Barrick and Robert Harriss and Robert W. Talbot and M. A. Shipham and Edward V. Browell and Daniel J. Jacob and Jennifer A. Logan},
  journal={Journal of Geophysical Research},
  year={1992},
  volume={97},
  pages={16731-16746}
}
Haze layers with perturbed concentrations of trace gases, believed to originate from tundra and forest wild fires, were observed over extensive areas of Alaska and Canada in 1988. Enhancements of CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H8, and C4H10 were linearly correlated with CO in haze layers, with mean ratios (mole hydrocarbon/mole CO) of 0.18 (± 0.04 (1 σ)), 0.0019 (± 0.0001), 0.0055 (± 0.0002), 0.0008 (± 0.0001), and 1.2 × 10−4 (±0.2× 10−4), respectively. Enhancements of NOy, were variable, averaging 0.0056… 

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