Atmosphere of Betelgeuse before and during the Great Dimming event revealed by tomography

@article{Kravchenko2021AtmosphereOB,
  title={Atmosphere of Betelgeuse before and during the Great Dimming event revealed by tomography},
  author={Kateryna Kravchenko and Alain Jorissen and Sophie Van Eck and Thibault Merle and Andrea Chiavassa and Claudia Paladini and Bernd Freytag and Bertrand Plez and Miguel Montarg{\`e}s and Hans Van Winckel},
  journal={Astronomy \& Astrophysics},
  year={2021}
}
Context. Despite being the best studied red supergiant star in our Galaxy, the physics behind the photometric variability and mass loss of Betelgeuse is poorly understood. Moreover, recently the star has experienced an unusual fading with its visual magnitude reaching a historical minimum. The nature of this event was investigated by several studies where mechanisms, such as episodic mass loss and the presence of dark spots in the photosphere, were invoked. Aims. We aim to relate the… 
A dusty veil shading Betelgeuse during its Great Dimming.
TLDR
Observations and modelling support a scenario in which a dust clump formed recently in the vicinity of the star, owing to a local temperature decrease in a cool patch that appeared on the photosphere, and suggest that a component of mass loss from red supergiants is inhomogeneous, linked to a very contrasted and rapidly changing photosphere.
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SOFIA upGREAT/FIFI-LS Emission-line Observations of Betelgeuse during the Great Dimming of 2019/2020
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A dusty veil shading Betelgeuse during its Great Dimming.
TLDR
Observations and modelling support a scenario in which a dust clump formed recently in the vicinity of the star, owing to a local temperature decrease in a cool patch that appeared on the photosphere, and suggest that a component of mass loss from red supergiants is inhomogeneous, linked to a very contrasted and rapidly changing photosphere.
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