Atlantic warm pool, Caribbean low‐level jet, and their potential impact on Atlantic hurricanes

@article{Wang2007AtlanticWP,
  title={Atlantic warm pool, Caribbean low‐level jet, and their potential impact on Atlantic hurricanes},
  author={Chunzai Wang and Sang‐Ki Lee},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2007},
  volume={34}
}
The Atlantic Warm Pool (AWP) is a large body of warm water (warmer than 28.5°C) that appears in the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea, and the western tropical North Atlantic during the summer and fall. Located to its northeastern side is the North Atlantic Subtropical High (NASH) that produces the easterly trade winds in the tropics. The trade winds carry moisture from the tropical North Atlantic into the Caribbean Sea where the flow intensifies forming the Caribbean Low‐Level Jet (CLLJ). This… 

Impact of the Atlantic Warm Pool on the Summer Climate of the Western Hemisphere

Abstract The Atlantic warm pool (AWP) is a large body of warm water that comprises the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea, and the western tropical North Atlantic. Located to its northeastern side is

Variability of the Caribbean Low-Level Jet and its relations to climate

A maximum of easterly zonal wind at 925 hPa in the Caribbean region is called the Caribbean Low-Level Jet (CLLJ). Observations show that the easterly CLLJ varies semi-annually, with two maxima in the

Hydrodynamics of the Caribbean Low-Level Jet and Its Relationship to Precipitation

Abstract The easterly Caribbean low-level jet (CLLJ) is a prominent climate feature over the Intra-America Seas, and it is associated with much of the water vapor transport from the tropical Atlantic

Tropical gradient influences on Caribbean rainfall

[1] Interbasin and intrabasin gradients play an important role as a part of a regional system of Caribbean climate drivers, which include the Atlantic warm pool (AWP) and the Caribbean low-level jet

Atlantic Warm Pool acting as a link between Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and Atlantic tropical cyclone activity

Multidecadal variability of Atlantic tropical cyclone activity is observed to relate to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), a mode manifesting primarily in sea surface temperature (SST) in

The North Pacific Blob acts to increase the predictability of the Atlantic warm pool

The Atlantic warm pool (AWP) has profound impacts on extreme weather events and climate variability. Factors influencing the AWP and its predictability are still not fully understood. Other than

Marine climate influences on interannual variability of tropical cyclones in the eastern Caribbean: 1979–2008

Interannual variability of tropical cyclones (TCs) in the eastern Caribbean is studied using MIT-Hurdat fields during the July–October season from 1979 to 2008. TC intensity shows local climate

On the Role of Pacific‐Atlantic SST Contrast and Associated Caribbean Sea Convection in August–October U.S. Regional Rainfall Variability

This study investigates the large‐scale atmospheric processes that lead to U.S. precipitation variability in late summer to midfall (August–October; ASO) and shows that the well‐recognized

Environmental Patterns Associated with Active and Inactive Caribbean Hurricane Seasons

This study of hurricanes passing through the Caribbean in the 1950-2005 period reveals that seasons with more intense hurricanes occur with the onset of Pacific La Nina events and when Atlantic SSTs

A modeling study of the interaction between the Atlantic Warm Pool, the tropical Atlantic easterlies, and the Lesser Antilles

[1] The European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts Reanalysis-40 and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/Department of Energy reanalyses are downscaled over the eastern Caribbean and
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 28 REFERENCES

Influences of the Atlantic Warm Pool on Western Hemisphere Summer Rainfall and Atlantic Hurricanes

The Atlantic warm pool (AWP) of water warmer than 28.5°C comprises the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea, and the western tropical North Atlantic (TNA). The AWP reaches its maximum size around

The Tropical Western Hemisphere Warm Pool

The Western Hemisphere warm pool (WHWP) of water warmer than 28.5°C extends from the eastern North Pacific to the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, and at its peak, overlaps with the tropical North

A Further Study of the Tropical Western Hemisphere Warm Pool

Abstract Variability of the tropical Western Hemisphere warm pool (WHWP) of water warmer than 28.5°C, which extends seasonally over parts of the eastern North Pacific, the Gulf of Mexico, the

Climatology of the Simulated Great Plains Low-Level Jet and Its Contribution to the Continental Moisture Budget of the United States

Abstract The Great Plains region of the United States is characterized by some of the most frequent and regular occurrences of a nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ). While the LLJ is generally confined to

Atmospheric Processes Associated with Summer Floods and Droughts in the Central United States

Abstract Persistent wet and dry events over the central United States are examined during summer. Composites based on selected persistent wet and dry events reveal common atmospheric processes and

Indian Monsoon Onset and the Americas Midsummer Drought: Out-of-Equilibrium Responses to Smooth Seasonal Forcing

Abstract Two dominant high-frequency features of Northern Hemisphere summer climatology are examined in an atmosphere–land general circulation model (AGCM): the sudden onset of rains in south Asia,

GLOBAL VIEW OF THE ORIGIN OF TROPICAL DISTURBANCES AND STORMS

Abstract A global observational study of atmospheric conditions associated with tropical disturbance and storm development is presented. This study primarily uses upper air observations which have

The midsummer drought over Mexico and Central America

Abstract The annual cycle of precipitation over the southern part of Mexico and Central America exhibits a bimodal distribution with maxima during June and September–October and a relative minimum

The 2005 hurricane season: An echo of the past or a harbinger of the future?

Recent Atlantic hurricane activity raises several questions. For example, why was the 2005 season so early and active and are there similarities with the past? We show that parallels exist between

The Recent Increase in Atlantic Hurricane Activity: Causes and Implications

The years 1995 to 2000 experienced the highest level of North Atlantic hurricane activity in the reliable record, and the present high level of hurricane activity is likely to persist for an additional ∼10 to 40 years.