Atlantic Cod Trypsins: From Basic Research to Practical Applications

@article{Gudmundsdttir2004AtlanticCT,
  title={Atlantic Cod Trypsins: From Basic Research to Practical Applications},
  author={{\'A}g{\'u}sta Gudmundsd{\'o}ttir and Helga Margr{\'e}t P{\'a}lsd{\'o}ttir},
  journal={Marine Biotechnology},
  year={2004},
  volume={7},
  pages={77-88}
}
Atlantic cod trypsin I is an appropriate representative of the traditionally classified cold-adapted group I trypsins, and the recombinant form of cod trypsin Y is the only biochemically characterized member of the novel group III trypsins. Trypsin Y is adapted to lower temperatures than all other presently known trypsins. This review describes the basic characteristics of and practical uses for trypsins of Atlantic cod, as well as those of other organisms. Overexpression of the recombinant… 
Biochemical characterization of a native group III trypsin ZT from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)
Fish trypsins: potential applications in biomedicine and prospects for production
TLDR
The potential uses of fishtrypsins in biomedicine and the enzymatic and structural properties of native and recombinant fish trypsins obtained to date are described, outlining some prospects for their study.
Potential Use of Atlantic Cod Trypsin in Biomedicine
TLDR
Results from a clinical study presented in this paper show that a specific formulation containing cod trypsin was preferred for wound healing over other methods used in the study, apparently, the high digestive ability of the cold-adapted codtrypsin towards large native proteins plays a role in its efficacy against pathogens and its positive effects on wounds.
Refolding and Activation from Bacterial Inclusion Bodies of Trypsin I from Sardine (Sardinops sagax caerulea).
TLDR
The activated recombinant TryI from Monterey sardine fish for further biochemical and biophysical characterization of its coldadaptation parameters showed three times more activity than the nonrecombinant trypsin alone.
Structural properties of trypsin from cold-adapted fish, arabesque greenling (Pleurogrammus azonus)
TLDR
A cDNA clone encoding trypsin was isolated from the pyloric ceca of cold-adapted fish, arabesque greenling, and the content of positively charged amino acid residues at the calcium-binding site of the AG-T was three times higher than those of tropical-zone fish trypsins.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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