Atherosclerosis research from past to present—on the track of two pathologists with opposing views, Carl von Rokitansky and Rudolf Virchow

@article{Mayerl2006AtherosclerosisRF,
  title={Atherosclerosis research from past to present—on the track of two pathologists with opposing views, Carl von Rokitansky and Rudolf Virchow},
  author={Christina Mayerl and Melanie Lukasser and R. Sedivy and Harald Niederegger and Ruediger Seiler and Georg Wick},
  journal={Virchows Archiv},
  year={2006},
  volume={449},
  pages={96-103}
}
It is now clear that inflammation plays a key role in atherogenesis. As a matter of fact, signs of inflammation of atherosclerotic plaques have been observed for centuries and also constituted the basis for a fierce controversy in the 19th century between the prominent Austrian pathologist Carl von Rokitansky and his German counterpart, Rudolf Virchow. While the former attributed a secondary role to these inflammatory arterial changes, Virchow considered them to be of primary importance. We had… 

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