At the feet of the dinosaurs: the early history and radiation of lizards

@article{Evans2003AtTF,
  title={At the feet of the dinosaurs: the early history and radiation of lizards},
  author={Susan E. Evans},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2003},
  volume={78}
}
  • S. Evans
  • Published 1 November 2003
  • Geography, Environmental Science
  • Biological Reviews
Lizards, snakes and amphisbaenians together constitute the Squamata, the largest and most diverse group of living reptiles. Despite their current success, the early squamate fossil record is extremely patchy. The last major survey of squamate palaeontology and evolution was published 20 years ago. Since then, there have been changes in systematic theory and methodology, as well as a steady trickle of new fossil finds. This review examines our current understanding of the first 150 million years… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
Calanguban is a scleroglossan lizard, making it the oldest non-iguanian squamate from South America, and likely the oldest scincomorph lizard from that continent, and a phylogenetic analysis inclusive of this species and of the oldest known lizard species in South America is provided.
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