At last, a Pennsylvanian stem-stonefly (Plecoptera) discovered

@article{Bthoux2011AtLA,
  title={At last, a Pennsylvanian stem-stonefly (Plecoptera) discovered},
  author={Olivier B{\'e}thoux and Yingying Cui and Boris C. Kondratieff and Bill P. Stark and Dong Ren},
  journal={BMC Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2011},
  volume={11},
  pages={248 - 248}
}
BackgroundStem-relatives of many winged insect orders have been identified among Pennsylvanian fossils (Carboniferous Period). Owing to their presumed 'basal' position in insect phylogeny, stoneflies were expected to occur at this period. However, no relative has ever been designated convincingly.ResultsIn this paper, we report specimens belonging to a new fossil insect species collected from the Tupo Formation (Pennsylvanian; China). The wing venation of Gulou carpenterigen. et sp. nov… 

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